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gagafanbase:

5 years ago, Lady Gaga launched one of the most iconic songs of all time. 

On October 19, 2009, the only song released by a female artist with Diamond Awards, was made ​​available on the main radios. 

What Gaga probably did not know was that music would win two Grammy’s and seven VMAs, beating several records worldwide.

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Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett for Parade Magazine.

Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett for Parade Magazine.

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exclusive footage of lady gaga absorbing tony bennet’s soul live

exclusive footage of lady gaga absorbing tony bennet’s soul live

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Lady Gaga by Sebastian Faena for Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, September 2014

Lady Gaga by Sebastian Faena for Harper’s Bazaar Arabia, September 2014

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ladyxgaga:

Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga talk about their new album and friendship in an interview with Parade Magazine, available Sunday, September 14th.

On Cheek to Cheek, Lady Gaga, you sing a poignant jazz classic, “Lush Life.”

TB: Lady said, “That’s one song I have to do.” She nailed it. You can hear her whole life in it.
LG: When I was 13, I’d sing [that song] with the Regis High School boys’ choir. I didn’t understand what the lyrics were about, but I understood the melody in a very intense way. Now I know everything that song is about. When I sang it [on this album] for the first time in 15 years, I started crying. I came into the control room, had my whiskey, and Tony held me and I cried in his arms. I kept saying, “Am I a mess, Tony? I don’t want to be a mess. I want to make you proud.” He said, “No, you’re not a mess. You’re a sophisticated lady.”

“Lush Life” is about loss, failure, and heartache. Did the song hit you as hard as it did because you’ve had some problems recently? [Lady Gaga had hip surgery last year and in November ­parted ways with her manager.]

LG: It’s heartbreaking. Six months ago I didn’t even want to sing anymore.
TB: Do you know what Duke Ellington said? He said, “Number one, don’t quit. Number two, listen to number one.”
LG: Right! The other day, Tony said, “I’ve ­never once in my career not wanted to do this.” It stung. Six months ago I didn’t feel that way. I tell Tony every day that he saved my life.

You felt like giving up? Why?

LG: I’m not going to say any names, but people get irrational when it comes to ­money—with how they treat you, with what they expect from you. … But if you help an artist, it doesn’t give you the right, once the artist is big, to take advantage of them. … I was so sad. I couldn’t sleep. I felt dead. And then I spent a lot of time with Tony. He wanted nothing but my friendship and my voice. [She begins to cry.]
TB: [quietly] I understand. [He holds her hand.]
LG: It meant a lot to me, Tony. I don’t have many people I can relate to.

People you can relate to, or people you can trust?
LG: Both.

How do famous people know if someone truly loves them and isn’t just using them?

TB: Well, you stay close to your family. Lady does. That’s what I did. [In 1979, Bennett’s career and finances were in turmoil, and his sons helped him turn things around.] I made a very good move when I said, “I’m going to have my son [Danny] manage me.” My other son [Dae] is my engineer on my ­recordings—he’s fantastic.
LG: What Tony’s trying to say in a nice way is that you can’t trust anybody.

No one?
LG: You can trust your family. You know, there were people I was sure were my friends. … I’m still learning. Now I’m a lot more careful.
TB: I have a great friend from when I was a singing waiter in Astoria [in Queens]. He has a little group that plays on Thursdays in a restaurant there. He’s still the same guy; I’m still the same. It has nothing to do with fame or success. He’s just happy to see me. And that’s the real thing.

What’s the most important thing you’ve learned from each other? 

TB: Nobody has communicated with the public more than Lady Gaga. Ever. I trust the audience, and I’m very impressed. As far as they’re concerned, she’s part of their family. The only guy who ever did that was Bing Crosby, years ago.

What have you learned from Tony?

LG: That it’s important to stay true to yourself. When I came into this with Tony, he didn’t say, “You’ve got to take off all the crazy outfits and just sing.” He said, “Be yourself.”… You know, people wrote a lot of things about my last album, Artpop, which was very controversial. If it didn’t grab the whole world the way The Fame Monster did, that’s okay, because I know it’s good. That’s what Tony has taught me, that my intuition is right. When he talks about the 66 albums he’s put out, the peaks and valleys, and how it’s not about having a hit record—it’s the most inspiring thing.

Read the rest of the interview at Parade.com

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20aliens:

Skyscrapers rise into the fog above New York City, circa 1980by Ernst Haas

20aliens:

Skyscrapers rise into the fog above New York City, circa 1980
by Ernst Haas

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